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Article
July 1952

USE OF THE ERYSIPHAKE FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED CORNEAL FOREIGN BODIES

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(1):48-49. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010051007

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Abstract

CORNEAL foreign bodies are commonly encountered and are readily removed in most instances; yet occasionally one finds an unusual case that offers a problem in treatment, such as that of a small, deeply embedded, nonmagnetic foreign body.

While it is true that in many instances these foreign bodies can be removed under the slit lamp, and that when they cannot be removed they can occasionally be left in situ without harm, there is the danger of perforation of Descemet's membrane and of entrance of the foreign body into the anterior chamber. In cases in which the foreign body extends into the anterior chamber, we advise the use of the erysiphake, the Bell type being the most applicable. It may be necessary to dissect the corneal stroma down to the foreign body, this being done best under the slit lamp with a Ziegler knife. The erysiphake bulb is filled with sodium

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