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Article
August 1952

CEREBRAL ELECTRIC RESPONSE TO INTERMITTENT PHOTIC STIMULATION IN AMBLYOPIA EX ANOPSIAA Preliminary Report

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY; With the Technical Assistance of Marjorie M. Edmond, B.A. BOSTON
Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, State University of Iowa College of Medicine (Dr. Burian).; Senior Fellow in Poliomyelitis, National Research Council, under a grant from the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (Dr. Watson).; From the Eye Service and the Neurological Unit, Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(2):137-143. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010142002
Abstract

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM  AMBLYOPIA ex anopsia and the closely related phenomenon of suppression present problems which extend beyond purely ophthalmologic interest. In amblyopia and in suppression there has been provided a "natural" experimental situation in which a tissue showing no discernible pathologic change is affected by a reversible inhibition of its function.Inhibition of function is a general property of the nervous system. In the case of more or less transient suppression of central vision in one eye and in amblyopia ex anopsia, a situation obtains in which one aspect of the inhibitory process is readily accessible to investigation in the intact human organism.Some authors believe that the seat of the inhibition in amblyopia ex anopsia is in the retinal neurons; others are of the opinion that the seat is in the central nervous system. We incline toward the latter view, since a study of the dark-adaptation process

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