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Article
August 1952

COMPARISON OF RESULTS OF CORTISONE TREATMENT BY INSTILLATION AND BY SUBCONJUNCTIVAL INJECTIONAn Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

HAIFA, ISRAEL

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(2):144-147. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010149003
Abstract

AS TOPICAL therapy for diseases of the cornea, cortisone is frequently given, either by instillation or by subconjunctival injection. Among the effects which cortisone may have on the diseased cornea is the inhibition of new vascularization. For this there is clinical evidence (Lepri,1 Olson and others,2 Steffensen and others,3 Barrios and Barrière,4 Thygeson and Fritz,5 Arruga,6 Scheie and others,7 Fitzgerald and others,8 Leopold and others,9 Woods,10 and Duke-Elder11) and experimental proof (Jones and Meyer,12 Ashton, Cook, and Langham,13 Lister and Greaves,14 and Michaelson15). Provided a precise method of measuring new vascularization is used, the effect of cortisone given as drops may be compared with that of the drug injected subconjunctivally in inhibiting new-vessel formation. The method described by Campbell and Michaelson16 (1949) appears to be precise enough for the present purpose and was used

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