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Article
September 1952

A METHOD OF PREVENTING RETAINING SUTURES FROM CUTTING INTO GRAFTS

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(3):344-345. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010352010
Abstract

VARIOUS types of plastic caps, or contact lenses, have been employed for maintaining contact between the corneal graft and the recipient cornea in an attempt to avoid injury to the graft from direct sutures or from the pressure of overlying sutures. The first of these, reported by Fritz,1 was a standard fitted contact lens which exactly covered the cornea. Sutures were passed through perforations at intervals along the edge of the lens and attached to the corneoscleral limbus. In this way, no sutures were in contact with the graft. This method proved unsatisfactory because the absence of air and lacrimal fluid in the wound area delayed healing.

A later model by Worcester2 had a clover-leaf-like shape and allowed free circulation of air and lacrimal fluid. This method of holding the graft in place was found satisfactory, the only objection being that each cap had to be molded to

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