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Article
October 1952

OCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN THE RAT MADE DIABETIC WITH ALLOXAN

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Departments of Anatomy and Ophthalmology, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(4):414-419. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010423003
Abstract

CATARACTS in rats made diabetic by pancreatectomy were observed by Foglia and Cramer1 in 1944, and in the same year Bailey, Bailey, and Leech2 reported cataracts in rats made diabetic with alloxan. Since these earlier studies, many investigators have obtained cataracts in diabetic rats. Most workers have pointed out that high blood sugar levels are imperative for cataract formation. This has been stressed in the recent publications of Sterling and Day3 and Patterson.4 By altering experimental diets, mainly by reducing the carbohydrate content, Charalampous and Hegsted5 and Rodriguez and Krehl6 have prevented cataract formation or delayed its onset in the diabetic rat. Kok-van Alphen7 found that if the diabetes in the rat was controlled with insulin, cataract failed to develop. The work cited demonstrates that cataract occurs either because of failure of the lens to metabolize glucose or because the high aqueous sugar

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