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November 1952

PAPILLEDEMA AS THE OUTSTANDING SIGN IN MENINGEAL HYDROPS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(5):557-566. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010568002
Abstract

SINCE the presenting signs and symptoms of meningeal hydrops are oftenest blurred vision, headache, and papilledema, it is important that ophthalmologists be acquainted with this entity. Accordingly, this report will be concerned with a description of meningeal hydrops and an analysis of seven cases from the ophthalmological and neurological services of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Meningeal hydrops is a clinical entity in which increased intracranial pressure is present without an expanding intracranial lesion or other obvious cause. With the usual symptoms and signs of headache, blurred vision, and bilateral papilledema, the cerebrospinal fluid is clear, and there is usually no abnormality in cells or protein, although the pressure is elevated. However, there may be exceptions, as reported by Ray and Dunbar1 and as noted in the case reports of Davidoff and Dyke2 and Dandy,3 in which a relatively slight increase

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