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Article
January 1953

NORMAL AND REVERSED VISION IN TRANSPLANTED EYES

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Anatomical Laboratory, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Osborn Zoological Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;49(1):28-35. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920020031005
Abstract

A SYSTEMATIC study of the morphology and function of the visual mechanism in the vertebrates reveals a variation in visual capacity and a wide alteration in the optic centers of the brain due to the development and elaboration of addition structures. On the other hand, the general morphological pattern of the eye as a whole or of its parts is quite similar in all these animals. This is particularly true when we consider certain features of that essential delicate membrane the retina, upon which many of the following experiments are focused.

In all vertebrate eyes a prominent pigment epithelium marks the basal layer of the retina, above which lie the three characteristic nuclear layers, namely, the rodcone elements, the intermediate bipolar cells, and the ganglion cells. Lacking a better term, I shall identify these layers, along with their intervening reticular zones and the inner and outer membranes, as the neural

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