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Article
March 1953

GLAUCOMA FOLLOWING OCCLUSION OF CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY

Author Affiliations

FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA.
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, and the Clay Memorial Eye Clinic, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Ga.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;49(3):280-284. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920020289005
Abstract

A SEVERE form of secondary glaucoma, usually called hemorrhagic glaucoma, often follows occlusion of the central retinal vein. Occlusion of the central retinal artery has been reported to be followed by glaucoma in extremely rare instances.

The recent observation of two patients in whom sudden severe unilateral glaucoma developed a few weeks after an occlusion of the central retinal artery seems of sufficient importance to warrant the presentation of an analysis.

In 1927 Opin reported clinical and pathological observations on this condition.1 A man aged 76, under treatment for mitral insufficiency and hypertension, lost the sight of his right eye suddenly and without pain. The characteristics of occlusion of the central retinal artery were seen ophthalmoscopically. No specific treatment was prescribed. Four and one-half weeks later the patient's right eye became painful. Intraocular tension was 40 mm. Hg. There were slight circumcorneal injection and epithelial edema. Physostigmine drops in

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