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Article
April 1953

HYDROCORTISONE (COMPOUND F) IN OPHTHALMOLOGYClinical and Experimental Studies

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Clinical and Research Departments of the Wills Eye Hospital.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;49(4):400-412. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920020410004
Abstract

DURING the past decade we have witnessed one of the great periods of medical history. The epoch of antibiotics and their role in infection is no less dramatic than the role of hormones and steroids in the relief of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. There have been numerous reports in the literature concerning their effectiveness in ocular disease. Leopold,1 Woods,2 McLean and associates,3 and others have convincingly shown that corticotropin and cortisone have a wide spectrum of activity. One of the great advantages of cortisone in ocular therapy is that it has proved effective when used locally. Many undesirable side-effects of systemic therapy have therefore been avoided.

Hydrocortisone, or Compound F, was first described by Mason, Hoehn, and Kendall in 1938,4 when they reported on the chemical structure of Compounds C. D, E (cortisone), F (hydrocortisone), and G, of the C12O4 series. Since that

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