[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.92.239.248. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1953

MINIMAL AMOUNT OF X-RAY EXPOSURE CAUSING LENS OPACITIES IN THE HUMAN EYE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(1):30-34. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030033005
Abstract

CURRENT events have focused attention on the ocular effects of radiation, and prime interest has centered about cataract production. A considerable amount of experimental work has shown that x-radiation of less than 250 r (200 to 1,000 kv.) can cause lens opacities in animals1 and that the younger the subject the greater the susceptibility. There is, further, evidence of a species variation by a factor of 2 to 3. The susceptibility of man is, of course, much more difficult to ascertain, and reliable data on this all-important aspect are limited to a few isolated instances. Our aim in the present study was to contact and examine as many persons as possible whose eyes had been exposed to a known amount of x-radiation and to determine thereby the least exposure which could cause an opacification of the lens that was visible with the ophthalmoscope or the slit-lamp biomicroscope.

Similar studies

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×