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Article
July 1953

CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE AND PARINAUD'S OCULOGLANDULAR SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

SOUTH BEND, IND.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(1):68-74. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030071010
Abstract

THE ETIOLOGY of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome has always been an enigma. In some cases the syndrome has been associated with tularemia; in many with leptothricosis, and in a few, with syphilis, tuberculosis, or sporotrichosis. In a large number of cases, however, a thorough search for an inciting factor has been of no avail, and the origin of the disease is surrounded with much uncertainty. Numerous reports concerning cat-scratch disease have appeared in the recent medical literature. In many instances Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome is probably a form of the same disease entity in which the etiologic agent has gained entrance into the conjunctiva rather than into the skin.

In 1889 Parinaud1 described cases of oculoglandular fever starting as conjunctivitis with granulations, associated with enlargement of regional lymph nodes and a moderate fever, which persisted for weeks. He believed that this disease was contracted from animals. Gifford,2 in 1898, gave

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