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Article
August 1953

HEMAGGLUTINATION TEST OF MIDDLEBROOK AND DUBOS IN OCULAR TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Administration Hospital.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(2):163-173. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030168004
Abstract

ALTHOUGH the clinical diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is a fairly frequent one, a positive clinical diagnosis is not common. With the exception of such pathognomonic lesions as a conglomerate tubercle of the uveal tract, miliary tuberculosis of the choroid, tuberculosis of the conjunctiva in which biopsy or the finding of tubercle bacilli leaves no doubt of the etiological agent, or the hypersensitivity type of lesion in which a definite focal reaction to the injection of tuberculin occurs, the diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is usually presumptive. It is generally made on the basis of a clinical picture of a chronic granulomatous disease in the eye when other causes of such disease are believed to have been ruled out. The presence or absence of various forms of supporting evidence, such as hypersensitivity to intradermal injection of tuberculin, calcified lymph nodes, or healed pulmonary lesions, may be used to shade the diagnosis toward

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