[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1953

GONIOSCOPY IN FOREIGN BODIES OF THE CHAMBER ANGLE

Author Affiliations

EAST ORANGE, N. J.
From the Departments of Ophthalmology of the Veterans Administration Hospital, New Orleans, and Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(3):319-322. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030326009
Abstract

THE ROLE of gonioscopy is widely appreciated at present, particularly in the management of glaucomatous processes; however, a valuable use of this technique appears to need emphasis. Gonioscopy permits the visualization of foreign particles in the anterior chamber angle, including those which are not demonstrable by other methods. Therefore, the procedure is of practical importance both in civilian and in military ophthalmology.

The clinical manifestations of foreign bodies retained in the anterior chamber angle depend in great part on the composition and chemical activity of such objects. Retained copper and iron are poorly tolerated, leading to chalcosis and siderosis respectively.1 Nickel, chromium, zinc, and lead are somewhat less active, while aluminum, gold, silver, and stainless steel may be well tolerated. Nonmetallic particles—sand, stone, glass, and Bakelite—may produce little or no response.2 Stallard1 stated that "small fragments of glass and bakelite may remain quiescent in the eye for

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×