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Article
September 1953

EPINEPHRINE AND ARTERENOL DETERMINATIONS IN AQUEOUS HUMOR AND IRIS AND CILIARY BODY OF CATTLE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology of College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(3):323-330. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030330010
Abstract

IN LINE with the experimental studies pursued in this laboratory on the physiological effects of arterenol (noradrenaline) and epinephrine on the intraocular pressure,1 the current investigations were undertaken in an effort to determine whether or not these chemical transmitters normally occur in the aqueous humor and in the anterior part of the uvea. Similar studies of their distribution in various body fluids, tissues, and organs other than the eye, in a number of species, have been reported.2 Bacq,3 Luco and Lissák,4 and von Euler2a included the aqueous humor in their researches, with contradictory results.

Changes in intraocular pressure produced by the systemic administration of fractions of a microgram of epinephrine and arterenol were found to be related to volume changes in the intraocular capillary bed, particularly to changes in the terminal vasculature of the anterior uvea. For this reason, and also by virtue of their

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