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Article
October 1953

IDIOPATHIC HYPOPARATHYROIDISM AND CATARACTReport of Four Cases

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Ophthalmology Section, Surgical Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, New York.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(4):455-461. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030463005
Abstract

HYPOPARATHYROIDISM began to attract attention with the introduction of thyroid surgery, in which, occasionally, the parathyroids are inadvertently removed.

Selye1 classifies hypoparathyroidism, according to etiology, under four types: (1) that due to spontaneous primary disease of the parathyroids (e.g., hemorrhages); (2) that due to operative damage to the parathyroids (e. g., postoperative tetany); (3) that due to excessive strain upon calcium metabolism in the presence of normal parathyroids (e. g., rickets, acidosis, and pregnancy), and (4) idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, of unknown etiology.

The criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, as formulated by Drake, Albright, and their co-workers,2 are (1) no operation on the neck; (2) low serum calcium; (3) elevated serum phosphorus; (4) normal renal function; (5) normal bones on x-ray examination.

Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism has been called "rare" by every author. A recent critical analysis of the literature by Steinberg and Waldron3 established the total number of

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