[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1953

ANOMALOUS BINOCULAR DEPTH PERCEPTION DUE TO UNEQUAL IMAGE BRIGHTNESS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Ophthalmology and the Oscar Johnson Institute of the Washington University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(4):475-478. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030483008
Abstract

DURING the naval battles of World War I, mistakes were made in discrimination of position and direction of movement of a formation of ships. To the lookout the ships appeared to be moving in a straight line, when in reality they were moving obliquely in step formation. Such an error in perception would be typical of anisopia or anisodominance. The anomalies apply especially to aircraft formation flying and landing operations but also to automobile traffic situations, where target and background contrast is unusually high.

Anisopia is an anomaly, discovered by Cibis,1 which may exist from a monocular defect in the brightness or in the focus of one retinal image. It results in an apparent rotation, or "venetian-blind effect," of contrasting surfaces in a frontal plane on their individual central vertical axes. When the phenomenon is elicited in a normal person by reducing the light striking one retina, it may

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×