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Article
January 1954

ASCORBIC ACID IN AQUEOUS HUMOR AND SERUM OF PATIENTS WITH AND WITHOUT CATARACTPhysiologic Significance of Relative Concentrations

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Department of Ophthalmology of the City of Detroit Receiving Hospital, and the Kresge Eye Institute.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(1):1-6. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040003001
Abstract

MANY ATTEMPTS have been made to explain how the concentration of ascorbic acid in the aqueous humor is maintained in excess of that in the blood.1 Three different mechanisms have been proposed: (1) Ascorbic acid is synthesized by the lens *; (2) ascorbic acid is transported across the ciliary epithelial border in the oxidized state (i. e., as dehydroascorbic acid), where it is reduced to ascorbic acid by the lens †; (3) ascorbic acid is selectively concentrated by the ciliary epithelium, whence it diffuses to the posterior chamber.7

The chief evidence in support of the theories that associate the lens with the maintenance of relatively high concentrations of ascorbic acid in the aqueous humor is the observation that the concentration of the acid is less than normal when the lens is cataractous or absent. For instance, reduced concentrations of ascorbic acid in the aqueous humor have been observed

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