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Article
January 1954

STUDY OF THE COMPENSATION-MAXIMUM TEST ON AQUEOUS VEINS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY; CINCINNATI
From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(1):24-31. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040026004
Abstract

KLEINERT and Grün1 and Kleinert2 observed in eyes suffering from different types of glaucoma a retrograde influx of blood from episcleral veins into aqueous veins during compression of the eyeball. The dynamometer pressure necessary to produce this phenomenon was termed compensation maximum. In normalpressure eyes compression of the eyeball up to 150 gm. usually would not produce this backflow phenomenon, while in glaucomatous eyes in many instances a pressure of 100 gm. or less sufficed to force back blood into the aqueous veins. The authors discussed extensively this phenomenon, which, in their opinion, proved helpful for clinical clarification of suspected cases of glaucoma.

Kleinert2 offered three explanations of the compensation-maximum phenomenon. In the first he quoted Lindner as assuming that during compression of the eyeball more than the usual amount of aqueous is expressed and leaves the inner eye through deep outlets and that this increased outflow

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