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Article
February 1954

RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS AS A DIAGNOSTIC AID IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(2):171-179. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040173003
Abstract

RADIOACTIVE phosphorus (P32) was first used as a diagnostic aid in the detection of breast tumors by Low-Beer in 1946.1 It was subsequently used to aid in localization of brain tumors by Selverstone and associates.2

In March, 1952, Thomas, Krohmer, and Storaasli3 published the first report on the detection of intraocular tumors with radioactive phosphorus. The technique used, in brief, was as follows:

Five hundred microcuries of P32 in the form of sodium biphosphate (sodium acid phosphate) in sterile isotonic saline was injected intravenously in patients with suspected intraocular tumors. Tetracaine drops were instilled in each eye for local anesthesia. Counts were made with a small Geiger-Müller tube over the area of the suspected tumor and in other areas of the same eye and on the other eye. The counts were made at intervals of one-half hour, one hour, and one and one-half hours after the

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