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Article
March 1954

UVEITIS: A MILITARY PROBLEM

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY
From the Ocular Research Unit, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(3):364-368. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040374010
Abstract

DESPITE recent advances in the treatment of infections elsewhere in the body, the commoner inflammations of the inner eye remain a problem in every population and are particularly costly to the military because of the long hospitalizations involved. A soldier can hardly be discharged from a hospital until he is capable of performing all the duties that may be required of him. His daily activities usually include exposure and strenuous exercise—neither conducive to the uninterrupted healing of uveitis.

Iridocyclitis and chorioretinitis of one variety or another make up the second commonest cause for admission on the eye service at Walter Reed Army Hospital. Only eye injuries and their sequelae are seen more frequently. Cases admitted primarily because of uveitis account for 5 to 10% of all admissions for eye disease, and individual cases require longer hospitalization than do any other, again aside from eye injuries.

Our attempts to resolve this

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