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Article
April 1954

INFECTIONS OF EYE SOCKET WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO TREATMENT WITH VARIDASE

Author Affiliations

FORT HOWARD MD.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(4):429-431. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040439001
Abstract

THE LOCAL use of streptokinase-streptodornase (Varidase) offers the surgeon an efficient biologic agent for the treatment of a wide variety of infections. Pus, which contains fibrin and deoxyribonucleoprotein, must be removed to promote healing.

Streptokinase is a catalytic agent which activates plasminogen in the euglobulin fraction of the blood. This causes a liquefaction of fibrin and inhibits the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. Streptodornase is a group of enzymes which requires catalytic activation by magnesium or manganese ion and which digests deoxyribonucleoprotein. Sherry, Johnson, and Tillett8 showed that streptodornase, acting on purified deoxyribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid in purulent exudates, produced a great fall in viscosity.

Varidase also contains an hyaluronidase,* aproteinase,1 a ribonuclease,4 and several nucleotidases and nucleosidases.† The function of these enzymes in the spread of the compounds in the pus and in the digestion of the various substrates is not well known at the

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