[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.3.44. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1954

USE OF RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS IN DETECTION OF INTRAOCULAR NEOPLASMS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Research, Wills Eye Hospital, and Albert Einstein Medical Center (Northern Division).

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(5):633-641. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040643007
Abstract

IN THE past few years attempts have been made to detect intracranial neoplasms with radioactive isotopes.* One of these was diiodofluorescein.2 This isotope has been shown to be of value in the detection of brain tumors. Since the retina and associated structures are closely allied to the brain, the possibility of detecting intraocular neoplasms by this technique was investigated.

The initial results obtained in the first three patients were unsatisfactory. It was felt that diiodofluorescein failed because it emitted gamma rays. Such rays mask detection of any concentration in a tumor of the eye, for the following reasons:

  1. 1. The volume of an intraocular neoplasm rarely occupies more than one-fourth of the globe.

  2. 2. Diiodofluorescein is taken up by normal tissue, as well as by pathologic tissue.

  3. 3. Gamma rays have marked penetrating power in tissue.

It appeared that a substance emitting pure beta rays would be preferable, as

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×