[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.146.176.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1954

EXPERIMENTAL EXOPHTHALMOS PRODUCED BY CORTISONE IN RATSFurther Observations

Author Affiliations

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND; PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Anatomy and the Department of Pharmacology, University of Birmingham Medical School, Birmingham, England.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;51(6):822-831. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040832009
Abstract

THE OBSERVATION that rats given cortisone for a prolonged period of time became "exophthalmic"1 prompted several questions. Was it, first of all, justifiable to consider the changed appearance as being due to classical exophthalmos, i. e., the undue protrusion of eyeballs normal in size and shape owing to changes in the retrobulbar tissues of the orbit; or was this appearance caused by a hormonally induced enlargement of the eyeballs, so that the latter no longer could be accommodated by the orbit? The second possibility was not considered likely on anatomical grounds. On the other hand, Jackson2 had observed that the eyeballs in chronically undernourished rats continued to grow, although any gain in body weight was prevented by the restriction of food intake. Since the prolonged administration of cortisone produces in rats a state not unlike chronic inanition, it was decided to examine the effect of this hormone on

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×