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Article
July 1954

ADULT OCULAR TOXOPLASMOSISReport of a Parasitologically Proved Case

Author Affiliations

BETHESDA, MD.; MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY; MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
Senior Scientist, United States Public Health Service (Dr. Jacobs).; Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D. C. (Major Bickerton).; Ocular Research Unit, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C. (Major Fair).; From the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Microbiological Institute, Bethesda 14, Md. (The work was supported in part by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness.)

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;52(1):63-71. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920050065007
Abstract

WITHIN recent years the question of the toxoplasmic etiology of uveitis has been the subject of various surveys and investigations. Frenkel6 (1951) found a correlation between skin test reactions and uveitis in a small group of hospital patients in California. Frenkel and Friedlander7 (1952) presented the results of the dye test of Sabin and Feldman13 on the same patients; they found most of the antibody titers to be low and postulated that the parasites could reside in the eye over long periods without stimulating antibody production. Hogan8 (1951), because of lack of correlation between serological findings and adult uveitis, considered it unlikely that many cases of adult uveitis are due to toxoplasmosis. Hogan, Thygeson, and Kimura9 (1952) later found the incidence of positive dye test reactions higher in patients of all age groups with chorioretinitis than in other groups, but in most cases the titers

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