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Article
July 1954

INFLUENCE OF LOW-VOLTAGE X-RADIATION ON INHIBITION AND PREVENTION OF NEW VESSELS IN CORNEAComparison with Influence of Cortisone

Author Affiliations

HAIFA, ISRAEL

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;52(1):77-84. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920050079009
Abstract

WHEN IT is desirable to limit the amount of vascularization in the cornea, the clinician usually resorts to the use of low-voltage x-rays, cortisone, or beta radiation. Although low-voltage x-rays are used in this way rather extensively, there are few reports on experimental work which should form the basis of a procedure difficult to assess clinically. While it has been shown that large doses of x-rays produce corneal damage followed by vascularization (Rohrschneider, 1929; Martin and Reese, 1942), in a series of experimental studies using total doses as low as 1,500 r Scheie and his collaborators have concluded that the vascularization produced by intracorneal sodium hydroxide injection can be markedly inhibited by low-voltage x-rays (1950). They found that daily exposures were more effective in inhibiting corneal vascularization than exposures given at longer intervals and that small single doses, of 300 r, were as effective as larger ones, up to 1,000

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