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Article
August 1954

METASTATIC CARCINOMA TO EYE FROM BREASTEffect of Endocrine Therapy

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;52(2):240-249. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920050242007
Abstract

THE PRESENT report concerns a patient who had a remarkable arrest and partial resolution of a metastatic carcinoma of the choroid with estrogen therapy. Eventually the tumor recurred in the iris and elsewhere in the eye, sparing relatively the original site of the ocular metastasis, and the eye was enucleated.

Metastatic tumors of the breast have been treated frequently in the past decade by castration, by androgens, and by estrogens, with varying but occasionally dramatic success. The mode of operation of these forms of therapy is obscure—indeed, at times these same agents appear to accelerate the growth of the cancer—but there is histologic evidence of a dual effect: early dissolution of the collagen about the tumor cells, with replacement by a fibrillar tissue, and necrosis of the cancer itself. Most amenable to this form of therapy are the more highly differentiated tumors and those having a compact connective tissue framework.

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