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Article
October 1954

OXYPHENONIUM (ANTRENYL), A SUBSTITUTE FOR ATROPINEA Clinical Study

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI; CHICAGO
From the Eye Department of the Cook County Hospital and Chicago Medical School.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1954;52(4):519-523. doi:10.1001/archopht.1954.00920050521003
Abstract

THE CONSTANT search for new synthetic mydriatic and cycloplegic drugs as substitutes for homatropine and atropine continues to stimulate the investigator. Most recently, cyclopentylate (Cyclogyl)1 and its allied chemicals* have met with some degree of success as short-acting cycloplegic replacements for homatropine.

Other similar-acting agents,5 whose initial effectiveness proved illusory, have, however, attained limited, though valuable, purposes in the ophthalmological armamentarium. Several such drugs are hydroxyamphetamine (Paredrine), phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine), eucatropine (Euphthalmine), and Dibutoline.6

There is no adequate long-acting synthetic cycloplegic substitute for atropine. Only BL 1397 (β-β-diphenyl-γ-dimethylaminovaleramide) approaches the efficacy of atropine in its autonomic ganglion-blocking action and its cycloplegic-mydriatic effect. However, it has not been made available.

Oxyphenonium (Antrenyl), as a potential substitute for atropine, came to our attention during the clinical study of its systemic administration, because of its side-reactions—dryness of the mouth and pupillary dilation. The prolonged cycloplegic and mydriatic action of this

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