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Article
January 1955

PREPARATION, STERILIZATION, AND PRESERVATION OF OPHTHALMIC SOLUTIONSExperimental Studies and a Practical Method

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Pharmacy, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School.; Pharmacist-in-Chief, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Massachusetts General Hospital (Mr. Murphy). Instructor in Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (Dr. Allen). Bacteriologist, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (Miss Mangiaracine).

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1955;53(1):63-78. doi:10.1001/archopht.1955.00930010065006
Abstract

MEDICATIONS available to the ophthalmologist and to his patients usually are obtained from one of three sources: local pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies, and hospital pharmacies. Of these, the local pharmacies dispense by far the greatest number of preparations. On the other hand, eye medications comprise only a small part of the total volume of drugs dispensed by local and hospital pharmacists. The standards for preparing collyria in an accurate and sterile manner are generally considered to be too exacting for the average pharmacist. Unless the impetus for improved practices is provided by ophthalmologists, progress will continue to be slow. We shall demonstrate that simple, relatively inexpensive measures are sufficient to achieve accuracy of formulation and sterility of collyria, without sacrifice of drug stability or power of corneal penetration.

The irony of transmitting disease by measures intended for its prevention is abhorrent to all physicians. A growing awareness among ophthalmologists of the

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