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Article
January 1955

CORRELATION OF VISUAL ACUITY AND ABSOLUTE LUMINANCE THRESHOLD IN RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA

Author Affiliations

New York
Professor of Physiology, Director of Department (Dr. Haig), and Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology (Dr. Saltzman), New York Medical College, Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1955;53(1):109-112. doi:10.1001/archopht.1955.00930010111012
Abstract

IN RETINITIS pigmentosa, pigment first appears at the equator and expands as a widening ring, encroaching upon the macula and the ora serrata. Pigment is very rarely seen in the macula itself, however, and when present is probably a manifestation of concurrent degeneration of the macula or of a healed choroiditis involving the macula.1 Despite the frequent absence of pigmentation in the macula, this structure is functionally impaired, as is shown by a reduction in visual acuity always observed in later stages of the disease.1 That macular function is reduced in early stages as well has been demonstrated by measurements of the absolute luminance * threshold by Mandelbaum4 and by Haig and Saltzman.5 Using a white test light subtending 3 degrees of visual angle and located at various angles in the horizontal meridian, Mandelbaum observed that in all of 17 cases the foveal region was involved, even

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