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Article
May 1955

Ocular Effects Produced by High-Intensity X-Radiation

Author Affiliations

St. Louis; Buffalo; Randolph Field, Texas
From the Departments of Ophthalmology, Neuropsychiatry, and Pathology, U. S. A. F. School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph Field, Texas.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1955;53(5):651-663. doi:10.1001/archopht.1955.00930010659006
Abstract

One of the outstanding features of radiation damage is the difference between embryonic and adult tissues and their reactions and the manner in which these reactions are manifested (Hicks*; Russell4; Wilson and Karr5; Wilson, Jordan, and Brent,6 and Warkany and Schraffenberger7 ). The sequence of x-ray-induced developmental abnormalities and a strict timetable of their genesis have been established in rats and mice by Hicks.3 He demonstrated a certain resistance of the embryonic tissue toward x-ray doses in the range of 100-200 r during the first eight days of gestation. No measurable damage resulted, and the newborn rat appeared normal. Doses ranging from 300-400 r and administered to the rats during the first eight days either destroyed the embryos or resulted in normal newborn rats. The same doses applied at a later time led to definite developmental defects.

In Anderson's textbook of "Pathology,"8 the lymphoid tissues,

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