[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.187.2. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1955

JOINT MEETING OF NEW YORK SOCIETY FOR CLINICAL OPHTHALMOLOGY WITH NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE, SECTION OF OPHTHALMOLOGYJan. 17, 1955 SYMPOSIUM ON RETINAL DETACHMENT

Author Affiliations

New York; New York; Boston; New York; Philadelphia

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1955;54(1):143-156. doi:10.1001/archopht.1955.00930020145016

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Dr. John M. McLean: Dr. Clark, in which cases would you use a scleral resection as a primary procedure? Why are scleral shortening operations better than classical diathermy in these cases?

Dr. Graham Clark: For the purposes of this discussion, all detachments may be divided into three categories:

  1. "Simple detachments," or those which will reposition themselves on removal of the subretinal fluid.

  2. "Complicated detachments," or those in which mechanical forces, such as retinal shrinkage, surface membranes, persistent strong vitreous traction, or agglutinated retinal folds, prevent the retina from repositioning itself against the wall of the eye.

  3. "Borderline," or "doubtful," detachments, or those in which the surgeon does not have sufficient evidence to put them in Class 1 or 2 or those with the retina under weak vitreous traction, which, while allowing the retina to get back to the wall, will, by the persistence of its pull, redetach it.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×