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Article
January 1956

USE OF THE BINOCULAR MICROSCOPE IN EYE OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

Groningen, Netherlands

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1956;55(1):114-117. doi:10.1001/archopht.1956.00930030116015
Abstract

EVER SINCE the moment that the slit lamp with binocular microscope came into daily use, ophthalmology has suffered from a strange and troubling discrepancy. We examine the eye and make our diagnosis with a magnification of 10 to 40, and we would feel hopelessly inadequate if we had to rely upon the naked eye. As soon as we start to operate, however, we do have nothing but the naked eye to rely upon, and to guide us through movements which may mean happiness or disaster to our patient.

In this respect, our technique has not advanced one step beyond our grandfathers', and all too often we feel like the proverbial bull in the china shop. What exactly we have been doing is revealed only by our slit lamp, a week or so after the operation! It is quite obvious what the next step has to be: We shall have to

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