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Article
August 1958

Use of Piromen in Ophthalmology

Author Affiliations

San Juan, P. R.
From Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1958;60(2):319-321. doi:10.1001/archopht.1958.00940080335021
Abstract

Piromen is a pyrogenic substance obtained from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This material has been shown to be a relatively nontoxic and a nonanaphylactogenic bacterial substance.1,2 Nesset and his associates3 have shown that it is nonprotein in nature. A number of investigators have shown that pyrogens are polysaccharides. They have been termed polysaccharides primarily because reducing sugars are obtained on hydrolysis. The nature of all the component reducing sugars is not as yet well known, but hexosamine has been fairly constantly detected. Hexosamine appears to be the only reducing sugar essential for fever production, according to these authors.

Since it has long been known that artificial fever has therapeutic value, research groups immediately started experimenting with Piromen for the artificial production of fever. It soon became evident to some of the research men working with this substance that relatively small doses which were not followed by any marked constitutional symptoms

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