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Article
July 1961

Brains by the Dollar

Arch Ophthalmol. 1961;66(1):3. doi:10.1001/archopht.1961.00960010005002

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Abstract

The prevailing opinion of a large and influential sector of our society would seem to be expressed in the above title. At a recent Senate hearing on the Federal Aid to Education Bill the dominant air and tone were permeated with the thought that more money will automatically turn out people better equipped to do everything from writing better English to having better morals. Rarely was the idea raised that more demands on the students with the present teachers and facilities might result in improvement of the quality of the finished product.

The concept that quality of students necessarily follows the application of technological advances is apparent in the promulgation of the recent Senate Bill 205 which would allocate every state up to one million dollars to develop television for education. A refreshing note was sounded by a few who doubted that this would be an automatic panacea, even though

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