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Article
October 1963

Sarcoma Following Irradiated RetinoblastomaReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

Siena, Italy
From the University Eye Clinic, Santa Maria della Scala Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1963;70(4):471-473. doi:10.1001/archopht.1963.00960050473008
Abstract

A previous paper from this Clinic1 reported a case of bilateral retinoblastoma in a child treated at the age of one year, by irradiation of the less involved eye, the right, with the Martin-Reese technique2,3; the fellow eye, much more involved, was treated by enucleation. The anophthalmic orbit was also irradiated immediately thereafter. The treatment was classified as successful with complete regression of the tumor in the remaining eye, and a retained vision of 1/10 for four years.

The child has now developed a tumor in the left nasal fossa. Such an occurrence following irradiation of retinoblastomas has been reported in the ophthalmic literature in 23 cases3-10; the majority of them have been interpreted as postirradiation sarcomas. Radiologists are familiar with this undesirable sequel which may occur in any irradiated site. Reese reported sarcomas arising in tissues subjected to large doses of deep x-ray therapy for retinoblastoma,

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