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Article
December 1963

Hemangioma of the Iris

Author Affiliations

San Francisco
Department of Ophthalmology, University of California School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1963;70(6):811-812. doi:10.1001/archopht.1963.00960050813015
Abstract

A review of the literature reveals only one case report of an angioma of the iris with histologic confirmation.1 The present report concerns a histologically proven cavernous hemangioma of the iris which clinically simulated an iris melanoma.

Report of Case 

History.  —A 48-year-old white male became aware of a tumor in the left iris three days before examination. At that time his young daughter noted that his eye had "two pupils." During the previous two weeks, there were short episodes of painless "cloudy vision" in this eye.Examination showed a localized tumor in the midstroma of the nasal iris of the left eye. It measured 2×3 mm and produced some distortion of the pupil (Fig 1). The angle was not invaded by the tumor, but on gonioscopic examination (Fig 2) the tumor was observed to have a multiloculated appearance with strands of white tissue surrounding dark-red material resembling blood.

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