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Article
April 1966

Clinical Aspects of Remedial Reading.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1966;75(4):586-587. doi:10.1001/archopht.1966.00970050588037

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Abstract

I know little about reading disabilities and I have not read 90% of the books and papers quoted in this essay, thus I write this review with some hesitation. Knowing little is considered dangerous, and knowing little also makes one opinionated. For me, Rudolf Flesch's book Why Johnny Can't Read is still the most important contribution to the subject. Like Dr. Flesch, I too am convinced that the main culprit is our deplorable "modern" way of teaching how to "look and say" rather than how to "read." (By reading I mean, of course, the translation of ordered sequences of visual symbols into ordered sequences of spoken sound. This a modern teacher is not supposed to teach. He is supposed to teach "meaning" from the very start.)

In the index to the volume I am now reviewing the name Flesch is missing, and so is the title of his book, among

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