[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.19.31. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1967

VISUAL DEFECTS AND LSD

Arch Ophthalmol. 1967;78(4):563-564. doi:10.1001/archopht.1967.00980030565025

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

To the Editor.  —A 20-year-old male college student with known low-grade Gilbert's disease, but without demonstrable jaundice, was seen on Dec 31, 1966, with a one-year history of change in central vision. The history was unclear, but he did admit to using lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on five or six occasions. He had no recollection of staring into the sun at these times. He had once smoked but had given this up before I saw him. He was myopic (OD -1.75, OS -1.00) and saw 20/40 and 20/60 corrected. He presented on Dec 31, 1966, a good foveal reflex on the right surrounded by vague drusen-like bodies. The left macula was edematous with similar white "dots." Vitreous cells were never seen.He was treated with prednisone, initial doses of 40 mg daily. The edema cleared but vision worsened to 20/60 and 20/100+ (corrected) by June 9, 1967. The final picture

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×