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Article
January 1974

Primary Intraorbital Meningiomas

Author Affiliations

Washington, DC; Boston; San Francisco
From the Registry of Ophthalmic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (Drs. Karp and Zimmerman), and the Eye Pathology Laboratory of the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco (Drs. Borit and Spencer). Dr. Karp is now at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Presbyterian-University of Pennsylvania Medical Center (Scheie Eye Institute), Philadelphia. Dr. Borit is now at Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and the Charles S. Kubik Laboratory of Neuropathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Dr. Spencer is now at the Estelle Doheny Eye Foundation, Los Angeles.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1974;91(1):24-28. doi:10.1001/archopht.1974.03900060028007
Abstract

The clinical and pathologic characteristics of 25 patients with primary intraorbital meningiomas were reviewed. The racial and sex predilections and the histologic characteristics of the tumors were found to be similar to those of intracranial meningiomas, but the primary intraorbital meningiomas were found to be more common and more aggressive in children than are meningiomas in other locations. Meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any lesion in a patient with progressive exophthalmos or visual loss, even in the first two decades of life, and the meningiomas should be treated surgically.

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