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Article
December 1978

Subepithelial InfiltratesA Probable Sign of Corneal Transplant Rejection

Author Affiliations

From the Iowa Lions Cornea Center, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1978;96(12):2234-2237. doi:10.1001/archopht.1978.03910060536013
Abstract

• A previously undescribed slit-lamp manifestation of a probable corneal transplant rejection reaction was found in 22 patients among 145 who underwent penetrating keratoplasty during a two-year period. The reaction consisted of subepithelial infiltrates that were located only in the donor tissue; were without associated conjunctivitis; and that occurred six weeks to 21 months postoperatively, either alone or in association with epithelial and/or endothelial rejection; and that responded well to topical corticosteroid treatment. In one case, the subepithelial infiltrates preceded a severe endothelial rejection by only a few days. The lesions are a warning that all is not well and that corticosteroid therapy should be instituted or increased.

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