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Article
January 1979

Human Neuropsychology

Author Affiliations

Bethesda, Md

Arch Ophthalmol. 1979;97(1):181. doi:10.1001/archopht.1979.01020010099030

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Abstract

Few ophthalmologists will select this book for their libraries, but those few (mostly neuro-ophthalmologists) will find it an extremely valuable thesaurus of information, discussion, and reference to cerebral dysfunction, many disorders of which involve vision. The senior author is a leader of the French school of neurologists and author of numerous articles on the aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, and allied disturbances. The junior author is a Boston neurologist with primary interest in visual and auditory functions. Together they have composed a text with a title that does not do justice to the magnitude of their coverage. It has as much relevance to clinical practice as it does to neuropsychology and neurophysiology. "Every observation of a single brain-damaged individual represents an opportunity for the clinician... to reinterpret mechanisms of function...."

Language and the aphasias constitute the initial chapters. Identification in the dominant hemisphere of Broca's area as a zone representing speech expression

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