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Article
April 1981

Ophthalmology in Internal Medicine

Arch Ophthalmol. 1981;99(4):706. doi:10.1001/archopht.1981.03930010706040

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Abstract

This book attempts to combine clinical aspects that involve both internal medicine and ophthalmology. The author is board certified in both specialties and, therefore, eminently qualified to attempt such a task. Because the book is written by a single author, this ensures evenness of style and avoids unnecessary repetition and overlap.

The book, however, suffers from two major defects. The first one is the quality of the illustrations. All illustrations are in black and white and are frequently reproductions or second-generation copies. Many of the illustrations come from the Mayo Clinic, and their reproduction is so flat and without contrast that, in many illustrations, it is impossible to find the depicted change. Even using a high-magnification loop, for example, I could not find the Kayser-Fleischer ring purported to be shown in Fig 6 through 10. The same holds true for Fig 13-2, which is supposed to show an anterior lenticonus.

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