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Article
May 1981

Acquired Color Vision Changes in GlaucomaUse of 100-Hue Test and Pickford Anomaloscope as Predictors of Glaucomatous Field Change

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Ophthalmology (Drs Drance and Douglas), Psychology (Dr Lakowski), and Mathematics (Dr Schulzer), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1981;99(5):829-831. doi:10.1001/archopht.1981.03930010829007
Abstract

• A five-year follow-up of eyes with elevated intraocular pressures, but without field defects, in which the color vision had been assessed by the 100-Hue test and an anomaloscope was carried out. Field defects developed in eight of 42 eyes with a low 100-Hue score, whereas field defects developed in ten of 13 eyes with a high abnormality in the 100-Hue test score. In the case of the anomaloscope (Pickford Nicholson) scores, field defects developed in four of five eyes with poor yellow-blue scores, whereas similar field defects developed in only nine of 40 eyes with a normal yellow-blue score. With regard to blue-green scores, field defects developed in six of 11 eyes with a poor blue-green score, whereas field defects developed in only seven of 40 eyes with a normal blue-green score. These differences are statistically significant, and the probabilities of an abnormal color vision that results in subsequent field defects have been worked out. The red-green scores were not predictive.

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