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Article
June 1983

Prognostic Factors in Corneoscleral Lacerations

Author Affiliations

From the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine. Dr Barr is now with the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Louisville.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1983;101(6):919-924. doi:10.1001/archopht.1983.01040010919013
Abstract

• Of 122 patients with corneoscleral lacerations repaired during a four-year period, 21 (17%) underwent enucleation primarily or within ten days of injury, 85 (70%) had at least six months of followup, and 16 (13%) were unavailable for follow-up. The most significant predictors of enucleation were poor initial visual acuity, the amount of hyphema, the presence of posterior uveal prolapse or vitreous hemorrhage, the extent of lens damage, and the length of laceration. The most significant predictors of a good visual outcome were good initial visual acuity, absence of hyphema, absence of posterior uveal prolapse or vitreous hemorrhage, and length of laceration. Final astigmatism was greater if the corneal wound was 4 mm or longer. Delaying the initial repair up to 36 hours had no effect on outcome.

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