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Article
October 1984

Cataract Surgery: Current Options and Problems

Arch Ophthalmol. 1984;102(10):1426-1427. doi:10.1001/archopht.1984.01040031156006

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Abstract

In the past ten years, the population of the United States has increased about 8%. However, the incidence of cataract surgery has increased by 100%. One explanation is that there has been a marked increase in the number of persons over age 65 years. That is true, but this number has increased only by 22% Therefore, the increase in cataract surgery has been far greater than can be accounted for by simple population increase, even among the elderly. The increase is more likely due to a relaxing of indications for cataract surgery, and it is probably correct to postulate that the introduction of intraocular lenses has been responsible.

In the past, when only contact lenses would restore binocular vision after monocular surgery, it seemed appropriate to wait until the vision in the better eye had failed. Now, with the successful implantation of lenses, binocularity is the rule rather than the

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