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Article
January 1985

Contrast Sensitivity in Diabetics With and Without Background Retinopathy

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Ophthalmology (Drs Sokol, Moskowitz, Skarf, and Evans), Adult Endocrinology (Dr Molitch), and Pediatric Endocrinology (Dr Senior), New England Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1985;103(1):51-54. doi:10.1001/archopht.1985.01050010055018
Abstract

• Contrast sensitivity measurements were obtained from 64 patients with insulin-dependent (IDDM) and non-insulin-dependent (NIDDM) diabetes mellitus who had normal Snellen acuity and minimal or no visible diabetic retinopathy. Contrast thresholds were determined for stationary gratings at six spatial frequencies, ranging from 0.5 to 22.8 cycles/degree (c/deg), and for 1.0-c/deg gratings phase-alternated at 15 Hz. Data from each group of diabetic patients were compared with data from age-matched normal subjects. We found that (1) patients with IDDM and no retinopathy had normal contrast sensitivity, (2) patients with NIDDM and no retinopathy had abnormal contrast sensitivity at only one spatial frequency (22.8 c/deg), and (3) patients with NIDDM and background retinopathy had abnormal contrast sensitivity at all spatial frequencies tested. We also found a dissociation of Snellen acuity and contrast sensitivity, indicating that contrast sensitivity can be used as an early index of changes in the retina not demonstrated by measurements of visual acuity.

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