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Article
March 1989

Ocular Pneumoplethysmography Can Help in the Diagnosis of Giant-Cell Arteritis

Author Affiliations

From the Neuro-Ophthalmology Service (Drs Bosley, Savino, and Sergott), Vascular Studies Laboratory (Dr Bosley and Ms Sandy), and Pathology Service (Dr Eagle), Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia; and the Vascular Laboratory, Lehigh Valley Hospital Center, Allentown, Pa (Dr Gee).

Arch Ophthalmol. 1989;107(3):379-381. doi:10.1001/archopht.1989.01070010389030
Abstract

• We compared the results of ocular pneumoplethysmography in nine patients who had a temporal artery biopsy (TAB) diagnostic of giant-cell arteritis with results of ocular pneumoplethysmography in nine patients with normal TAB results and 112 patients with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or central retinal artery occlusion assumed to be nonarteritic. The mean ± SD ocular pulse amplitude with ocular pneumoplethysmography was 3.9 ± 1.8 mm in the group with abnormal TAB results and 10.6 ± 4.0 mm in the group with normal TAB results. Every patient with abnormal TAB results had an average calculated ocular blood flow less than 0.60 mL/min, while only one patient with normal TAB results fell in this range. The average calculated ocular blood flow had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93.4% in the diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis, with a diagnostic accuracy of 93.9%. These results rival the diagnostic accuracy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and TAB results.

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