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Article
August 1990

Topical Ultraviolet Light-Absorbing Chromophore Protects Against Experimental Photokeratitis

Author Affiliations

From the Doheny Eye Institute and the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1990;108(8):1142-1144. doi:10.1001/archopht.1990.01070100098042
Abstract

• Ultraviolet radiation may play a causative role in a number of human ocular and dermatologic conditions; reduction of environmental UV light exposure may decrease their incidence. We investigated the effects of two different UV light-absorbing chromophores, octyl methoxycinnamate (Parsol-MCX) and butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (Parsol-1789) on corneal UV light transmittance, and evaluated topically applied Parsol-MCX for its protective effect against experimental UV light-induced keratitis in New Zealand white rabbits. Both Parsol-1789 (UV-A light absorber) and Parsol-MCX (UV-B light absorber) are well tolerated by New Zealand white rabbit eyes. Pretreatment with a single drop of Parsol-MCX reproducibly protected against UV light-induced keratitis, apparently by absorbing greater than 75% of UV-B (peak wavelength, 308 nm) irradiation.

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