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Article
August 1991

Endogenous Candida Endophthalmitis After Intravenous Anesthesia With Propofol

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Ophthalmology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Ill (Drs Daily and Dickey), and Illinois Retina Associates SC, Harvey, Ill (Dr Packo).

Arch Ophthalmol. 1991;109(8):1081-1084. doi:10.1001/archopht.1991.01080080041024
Abstract

• Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic agent that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 1989. It has gained rapid acceptance and is in widespread use. In June 1990, the Centers for Disease Control reported four clusters of postsurgical infections associated with the use of propofol. We describe one of those clusters, consisting of four cases of endogenous Candida albicans endophthalmitis. These infections occurred in nonimmunocompromised patients after they had undergone nonophthalmologic surgery in which propofol had been used as anesthesia. An investigation by the Centers for Disease Control concluded that the infections in these patients were due to extrinsic contamination of propofol during preparation for use at the hospital. Ophthalmologists should be aware of this new potential source of endogenous endophthalmitis.

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