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Article
June 1992

Color Atlas/Text of Ophthalmic Parasitology

Author Affiliations

Tamil Nadu, India

Arch Ophthalmol. 1992;110(6):759. doi:10.1001/archopht.1992.01080180029013

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Abstract

Apart from toxoplasmosis and the recent epidemic of Acanthamoeba keratitis, most ophthalmologists are unfamiliar with parasitic infections despite the fact that some occur frequently and are endemic in some parts of the world. However, as the authors rightly point out, increasing international travel and the influx of people from tropical countries have facilitated the spread of parasitic disease to all parts of the world. This, coupled with the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, has made some previously uncommon infections, such as Pneumocystis carinii, common and resulted in a need for better understanding of ocular parasitology.

"... probably the first ophthalmic textbook devoted exclusively to parasitic infection."

Most of the standard ophthalmology textbooks and those on infectious diseases only briefly address parasitology. This is probably the first ophthalmic textbook devoted exclusively to parasitic infections. Its five sections discuss diseases caused by protozoa, nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, and arthropods and describes 30 parasitic disorders

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